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20121129
20121207
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
our economy. >> reporter: republicans led by house speaker john boehner says he should quit campaigning and take care of the business at hand. republicans say they are willing to consider raising more revenue but they want to see spending cuts to go along with it. >> we need to hear they are willing to make spending cuts now, not promises of spending cuts sometime if the future. to me the tidal waves that are coming at us is social security and medicare and the new health care law. >> reporter: now house democratic leader nancy pelosi is calling the speakers to bring the tax to the floor by tuesday or she will try to force a vote. boehner is not likely to buckle under pressure so it seems like a standoff. >> gregg: sfuaf. what a surprise? they want to resolve this fiscal crisis or lack in his real compromise. john boehner is leading an attack on the lack of progress. >> there is a stalemate. let's not kid ourselves. it was not a serious proposal. so right now we're almost nowhere. >> gregg: almost nowhere. how about that? staff writer for roll call joins us live. the preside
tougher in going after speaker john boehner's latest proposal in saying it simply doesn't add up. >> we don't know who pays. we don't know what we're talking about in terms of actual legislation to increase revenues. it's magic beans and fairy dust. >> the bottom line is the president and speaker boehner have not spoken now in several days. so there is really no signs of progress. there has been some discussion that look that's just happening in public. behind closed doors maybe they are gaining some ground, i have spoken to some top white house officials tonight some top republicans on the hill they say in private they are not making progress either, shep. >> shepard: republicans say they have offered some compromises. >> they have in the sense that speaker boehner with his policy late yesterday put $100 billion in new tax revenue on the table. that was a concession by him but not far enough as you noted for the white house because the white house wants him to not just raise tax revenue by limiting intuctions and loopholes and the like. they want to see tax rates go up but republic lea
? >> reporter: we heard from speaker john boehner who said that treasury secretary geithner did not come with a substantive plan in terms of spending cuts. we know the republicans were hoping when the treasury secretary came here to capitol hill, that he would have laid out some serious spending cuts because the republicans are saying if we're putting revenue on the table, we need to see some serious spending cuts from the white house. i think it's important to note the difference between what is said in public and what is said in private. these meetings are held in private. in public lawmakers are sounding a little tougher. here's the senate majority leader on the senate floor earlier today. >> for four months house republicans have refused to act. instead, they've held the middle class hostage to protect the richest 2% of taxpayers, people who enjoy a decade of ballooning income and shrinking tax bills. >> reporter: so that is the public sentiment from the senate majority leader, blasting the republicans for not passing the tax cuts for the middle class. in private, though, it sounds l
speaker john boehner. the two agreed it was in foeryone's best interest to get a fiscal cliff deal sooner rather than later, both agreed to aim for one before christmas, but they also acknowledged, scott, it will be very difficult to achieve that. >> pelley: thank you, major. will the president's team find a receptive republican congress? nancy cordes is on capitol hill for us tonight. nancy. >> reporter: well, scott, one top republican aide actually told me today that he sees these talks as one-sided, that republicans have been making all the proposals, and speaker boehner said he's still waiting for a balanced offer from the white house. >> republicans are willing to att revenue on the table but it's time for the president and democrats to get serious about the spending problem that our country has. >> reporter: today on capitol hill, erskine bowles met with both sides. he's the co-chair of simpson- bowles commission that drew up a leading plan to cut the federal debt. >> i upon hopeful but i wouldn't put me in the optimistic wetegory. we have a long way to go and a very few days to get
complain the new proposal from house speaker john boehner is too vague about tax increases even as it lays out a tough package of spending cuts. for instance raising medicare's eligibility age for the first time in the program's history most likely by two years from 65 to 67 the move would not apply to americans who are close to retirement now. it would be phased in for younger workers such as maggie, a virginia health club manager who just turned 50 last month. >> i think the biggest factor for me is when are you going to retire so you lose your insurance from work and if it goes to 67 you have this two- year gap. what are you going to do? >> reporter: when medicare was created in 1966, the average life expectancy for men was 67 years, today it's 76 and women live on average to 81. one recent study by the kaiser family foundation estimated that shifting medicare eligibility from 65 to 67 would save the federal government $5.7 billion a year. 65 and 66-year-olds would pay an extra $3.7 billion a year to ensure themselves. the employers would pay billions more. >> it would finally bankrupt
, the speaker of the house john boehner had a phone call late yesterday, the first call they had in a week. there has not been much in the way of leaks as to what was discussed. most folks on capitol hill may suggest that no leaks means they are getting down to serious movement on finding a compromise to avert the fiscal cliff. because in public the treasury secretary was asked yesterday if the administration is prepared to go over the fiscal cliff. check this out. >> is the administration prepared to go over the fiscal cliff. >> absolutely. we see no prospects for an agreement that doesn't involve those rates going up on the top 2% of the wealthist. remember it's only 2%. >> reporter: most people think a deal will be struck between the president and the speaker of the house, the fact that they are talking and not leaking may be a good sign, jenna. jenna: we'll see. what role has treasury secretary timothy geithner, we just heard from him there, what role has he played in awful all o all of this. >> he's been the public spokesman and delivered the president's plan to capitol hill, which th
they would achieve. house speaker john boehner inc insists his offer is the best one on the table calling it a credible plan that deserves serious consideration by the white house. jenna: mike emanuel is with us. certainly a challenge to find this ideal plan. what is holding it up. >> reporter: the chairman of the senate budget committee wants a large come proceed hence i have deal in the range of $5 trillion and says a grand bargain can get done if everybody kaoels cool and doesn't overreact to every valley over the net. he this is a camp david-style summit might help things move around. a senate republican told greta van susteren it's time to be honest about retirement benefits. >> you and i need to pay a little more into the system because we can afford it. that is the kind of entitlement reform we need. >> reporter: that gets older americans and their groups all worked up thinking you could be messing with their benefits. jenna: a hot toeupb hot topic, and taxes. it seems they need to have some sort of increase in taxes. how does that play out. >> reporter: the statement from the whit
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)